EA Shuts Down Microtransactions in Star Wars: Battlefront 2 Hours Before Release

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The angry rampage of Star Wars fans and gamers alike have finally driven Electronic Arts (EA) to take action. The chief executive officer of EA, Andrew Wilson, had a conversation with Walt Disney chief executive, Bob Igers, which resulted in the temporary removal of in-game-transactions.
This means that Crystals are not purchasable on all platforms, therefore loot boxes cannot be bought with real money and all new players start off on a leveled ground.

WHY FANS ARE ANGRY

Star Wars: Battlefront II was always a popular topic amongst gamers. However, when the game went into open beta in October, it really got everyone’s attention. And not for good reasons.
It seems like online multiplayer video games have entered the era of loot box systems. Many games have implemented this system, such as Overwatch and League of Legends that allow players to either level up and earn their loot boxes or buy them with real money. However, all the items in the loot boxes are solely for cosmetic purposes.
EA and Star Wars: Battlefront 2 developers, DICE, made the mistake of putting game-changing items in their loot box system. For instance, abilities and overpowered weapons that would give players an advantage in battle. This made Pay to Win a real possibility.
Of course, EA justified that loot boxes are completely farm-able and that players are not required to purchase them. However, Youtuber ChampChong did the math and as it turns out:

Image via Twitter

EA’S RESPONSE

Since then, EA has noticed the increasing number of unhappy fans. It was obvious that continuing down this path would be detrimental to their game sales and reputation. Thus, prompting them to release the following statement:

It’s far-fetched to believe that a multi-million dollar company like EA would remove micro-transactions from the game permanently as it generates revenue. But they may completely remove gameplay-altering items from the loot boxes and just have cosmetics in them.
Maybe this will convince other publishers like Take-Two, the publisher of GTA, to rethink their microtransactions more carefully.

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